Housing in Russia and where do Russians typically live?

Entrance

Most Russians live in apartment buildings. The stairwell is considered a public space and is cleaned by communal services. Also in the intervals between apartments are often kept bicycles, strollers, shoes, etc.

Hall

Many Russians have two front doors, one simple wooden door, which opens inward, and another metal door, which is outside, all made for safety, Also, in mid-size apartments, the corridors are small enough to hold a wardrobe, a mirror, and possibly a shoe rack. The hall also has an entressol (a French word familiar to all Russians). These under-the-ceiling shelves, with doors like cupboards, usually offer huge storage spaces

Kitchen

Most people I know have a spacious kitchen that holds an oven, two refrigerators, crates and so on. But I also know people who have too small a kitchen that can only have one person because the two of them are too crowded.Also the Russian people’s kitchen and dining room are combined, but often when many guests come, the table is set in the living room.

Rooms

In most cases, the big sofa is a convertible, and at night the living room turns into the ‘master bedroom’ for the parents; while the “small room,” or “children’s room,” is where the kids sleep, play and do their homework. Another important part of residential life is the balcony, which often doubles as a storage space, a small parlor, a place to hang and dry clothes, a place to smoke if your family is against smoking inside.

Bathroom/toilet

Bathrooms and toilets are often in the same room, but many people prefer them to be separate. Also, we can have a shower and a bath in the same places, because the shower set above the bathroom, which allows connecting the shower booth and the bath.